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The Pitfalls of Speed Painting

Journal Entry: Sun Nov 20, 2011, 3:48 PM
I've been meaning to write about this for a while now, but recently a video popped on up Ctrl+Paint about the same topic and it encouraged me to finally talk about it. It's a practice that's been misconstrued and misunderstood for a while now, so I wanted to help people get a proper understanding on the subject.

Speed painting has been something of a fad for 4 or 5 years now, even back when I was first starting digital work. Like many artists out there, I thought, "Sweet, I can do really cool work, really fast!" And like many artists out there, in the back of my head I was probably thinking, "This is easier than learning the normal way!"

Crashed Pod by leventepSpeeeed paint by AndreeWallinScifi city speed 2 by AndreeWallin


Well, here's the main problem in regards to speed painting. Any of those really cool, realistic and well done speed paintings you see are done by professionals who have been painting for years and years. These are people who learned their fundamentals the long, hard way. Things like perspective, color, lighting, anatomy, etc. Using a perspective grid transformation trick isn't much good unless you understand how perspective actually works.

These pros have a solid grasp of those fundamental concepts, and from years of practice have the ability to paint quickly while adhering to them. In essence, speed comes with skill and knowledge, not the other way around. Speeding through paintings will not increase your skill, nor your knowledge because you'll never fully understand why any of it works the way it does.

Perpetuating the misconceptions are "speed painting" videos you YouTube, where a really awesome painting is shown being made, and the thing is sped up to last 5 minutes, the duration of a song they put to it. What they often don't mention (or do sometimes, if you look in the description), is that the painting took 25 hours, not 45 minutes.

Obviously that's not a speed painting at all. Many of my fully finished works take between 15-25 hours, I'm just not speeding them up for YouTube and putting the wrong label on it. It's a painting shown quickly, not one done quickly.

Speedpaint duo no.3 by AndreeWallinquick landscapes by leventepSpeedpainting 01-2007 by Pierrick


Another thing that many people don't understand is that speed painting is most often a means to an end. In other words, in a production pipeline on a movie or game, concepts very often need to be done super fast, where someone doesn't have 15 hours to spend on a concept. This forces them to use their artistic knowledge to get the gist of an idea down in as little time and as few strokes as possible.

Many people think that doing a speed painting means working as fast as your arm will let you, and putting down really quick, rough strokes, but that's not it at all. In order to do a good job, an artist has to make a lot of smart choices and make deliberate strokes to convey what they need to. It can often be a trial and error process, even for pros, but they know how to utilize that experimentation properly. Hell, I don't even bother with speed paintings anymore because I don't feel I'm up to that level of understanding yet.

There are a lot of fantastic artists out there that can do great speed paintings, but if you take a closer look, you'll see that the best and most successful speed paintings are done by artists who can also draw and paint the 'normal' way as well. These are people who didn't set out to do speed paintings, they are people who gained the ability to do them through hard work and practice.

SP New-Old-World by ANTIFAN-REALTron legacy End of Line speed by vyle-artSP Off World Refueling by ANTIFAN-REAL


There's nothing wrong with speed painting, I think it's a fantastic means to get an idea onto the canvas. Concerning oneself primarily with light and shapes as opposed to small details can be very important and artistically rewarding. It's just that it's easy to get the wrong idea about what it is, why it's done, and when it's a good idea to do it.

I don't want to deter anyone from trying speed painting if they're curious, but if you're going to pursue that, make sure you spend some time really learning those fundamentals. Take some time on your paintings, have a little patience, and you'll see the quality of your work increase pretty substantially over time.

I wish you all the best of luck with your work, and if you have any questions about the subject, feel free to ask me and I'll do my best to answer. Take care!

Add a Comment:
 
:iconmysieblondie:
mysieblondie Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2013
I found everything you said here helpful. :) But my idea of a "speed painting" was copying a photograph or using life reference, simply for practice. 

In your opinion, do you get more out of doing ten 1 hour studies (speed paints) or one 10 hour study?
Reply
:iconlostfallenhero:
LostFallenHero Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2013  Student General Artist
Strange how I've only just found this journal now.
I've only just recently started doing speed painting to see if I can improve a bit in digital painting, but I find it to be incredibly difficult (although that's because I prefer to add in as much detail as I possibly can and not skip out on certain things). I've got the basic gist of perspective and anatomy, but I'm still pretty bad.
I'm more of a traditional artist myself, so digital painting (even with my graphics tablet) is pretty hard for me, but I am learning as I go along.

My question for you is that, because you are a professional at what you do, have you ever done a visual diary using traditional means or digital means to improve? Despite my current knowledge on some of the fundamentals of the art world, I'm still learning a new thing every day that I either take a note of or just add to my sketchbook.

Also, how do you stay motivated when you do your work as I can't seem to stay focused enough when I paint/draw? 
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:iconsuperbum:
Superbum Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012  Student General Artist
I think you brought up an important topic of how with digital technology it feels like people are cutting corners; basically building their house on a swamp for a foundation. I brought up this point back in school but unfortunately I was apart of a curriculum that hated people who had traditional potential and loved the ones who had figured out he computer so easily.
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:iconzephyri:
Zephyri Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
First ever journal I've favourited. I can't even begin to agree with this enough. There's this misconception that being able to paint fast and without reference is the best way to get noticed, or go pro. But unless you understand what it is you're trying to put into shorthand, effectively, it's always going to be apparent that you don't really know your subject. Only way to really know a subject is to spend time studying it, and getting to know all it's little foibles.

I should write stuff like this more. Consider me inspired!
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:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
:salute: Glad you liked it!
Reply
:iconsnazz84:
Snazz84 Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
I was just discussing this same thing with a friend the other day, really great to hear a professional say the same thing. I'm mostly a 3D modeller, so I look at "speedpaints" and enjoy them for what they are, but there must be a lot of aspiring concept artists out there who think these works of art are being created in less than an hour apiece and wonder why their own work never gets anywhere close. Could be quite demoralising.
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:iconthewiseweirdprophet:
TheWiseWeirdProphet Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
never fav'd a journal before, but this one was worth it :) (awesome works aswell btw :) ):+fav:
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:iconzombiesandwich:
ZombieSandwich Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2011  Professional Filmographer
Hello Rahll,

I really like your journal, you explained this very well!
Since I got some videos on Youtube, too, I noticed that recordings of your work (which you then speed up) sadly only get clicked when you add "speed painting" to it.
Which is wrong, and it bugs me, too. So I decided to always add to it in the description how/ why it is not a real speedpainting and just something that was "speeded up" with video software.

The misconception has already spread so far that I am really glad people with wellseen profiles like you are taking the time to explain it, so thank you. :)
Reply
:iconfishpaste89:
FisHPastE89 Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2011  Professional Interface Designer
thanks for the explaination, it really helps to put it into perspective
Reply
:iconcakebandit:
CakeBandit Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
And here I find this JUST after they add the favorite button for journals!
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:iconinkjexion:
Inkjexion Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2011
awesome post man.... that is true with painting.... patience is the best trait that artists need to develop...... because it applies to everything,....


thanks for this post man!
Reply
:iconangeliclionheart:
AngelicLionheart Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Well-written, Reid. Good stuff.
Reply
:iconzombycat:
zombycat Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2011  Student Digital Artist
Thank you for posting this, Rahll. I found it very helpful c:
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:iconkamazotz:
Kamazotz Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2011  Professional General Artist
Thanks for breaking some of the myths. Most of the speed paintings I see look very detailed. Personally it would take me a hell of a lot of hours to do that lol. I'll just keep on practicing till then.
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:iconsicram:
sicram Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
I... I thought this was common knowledge? How could one possibly make awesome stuff quickly without knowing the "normal" stuff first? It's like assembling something in lego in just a few seconds, freehand. If one has been playing with lego a lot then one knows what all the bits can do (mostly) and can thus make something neat, quickly. Give it to someone who hasn't and they'll be exploring the bits to make them fit instead. (Just realised I made a recap of what you said, whoops)

I gave a try at speed painting once and eh, at best it could be considered an almost okay base for something that would take longer.

It's good that someone who knows what he's doing is telling this to the un-enlightened ones.
Reply
:iconbluefootednewt:
bluefootednewt Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Student General Artist
Wow, thank you for sharing this. :thanks: Really helped me get a new perspective. :iconyesyesyesplz:
Reply
:iconx-venezia-x:
x-Venezia-x Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks for writing this! To be honest I also thought that speed painting was all about quick movements and rough strokes.
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:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
:salute:
Reply
:iconmarcocasalvieri:
marcocasalvieri Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Student Digital Artist
Hey Reid, what I'm going to ask you is not completely related to the topic of the journal, but I guess it's still pertinent: what should I do in order to become 'professional'? I mean, what if I want to make art as a job? There are tons of things I should add in order to give you reasons of why I'm asking you this instead of going to an art school here in Italy, but since I'm not sure you're going to consider the question.. so if you'd like to give me an answer, even a short one (and it would already be something great since 90% of the professional artists I've contacted recently just ignored me), we could talk via e-mail or note on deviantart, or just here in the comments.

Thank you very much, for the journal as well. Definitely agree with what you're saying. I've always thought that speed painting comes after you're good at regular paintings, since you must know how to paint with 10 brush strokes what regularly would take 1000, so you actually need such a deep 'knowledge' of things that you can immediately find the main parts of it, skipping all the details but still making it look like the detailed version of it.
Reply
:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
That's a bit of a hard question to answer actually. Every professional finds their way into the industry in a slightly different way, so there's no obvious tried and true method. There are however a few things I tell everyone who asks me those sorts of questions.

The most important thing is to work your ass off. Whether you're attending a school for art, or learning on your own, you need to paint as much as you possibly can. And not just paint for the sake of have a TON of work, but for learning and growing. Take on projects that you KNOW will challenge your abilities, try new things. Don't take the easy way out if you can help it.

The second thing that really helps is being a part of art communities online. Places like deviantART, CGHub, Conceptart.org, CG Society. Make sure you interact with other artists, ask questions, make friends. Not only will they help you with your work and give you insight, but they'll very often be the among the first people to recommend you for some work.

One of the big cliches of the artistic and business world is "it's not what you know, it's who you know." While this is sometimes a stretch, it's very often true. That's not to say you can have crappy work, and know someone important and they'll get you an amazing job. You still need awesome work, but sometimes just knowing or befriending the right types of people can mean the difference between working on cheap commissions and working on a Hollywood movie.

Another important step is linked to being a part of those online communities. Have your work up in as many places online as you possibly can. Try to brand yourself and make a name for yourself. I have my work on a numerous sites, and I get contacted by people quite often who have seen my work on one site or another. The more you put your work out there, the more likely it is to get noticed by the right people who could potentially set you up with some work.

And, of course, the more work you do, the more references you have and the better the portfolio. And if you continually do a great job, those people might recommend you to others, and after you do enough of that, word of mouth gets around and eventually you get offers without really even trying.

That doesn't work for everyone of course. Many people spend their time applying to studios or looking for work, but it's not the way things happened for me. I find it easier to compete in the freelance world than it is to compete with other top tier artists for very limited jobs at specific studios. But of course, once you build an awesome portfolio, it makes it easier to get one of those jobs down the line. Just don't expect to apply right away and get a job there.

At the end of the day, it's going to happen differently for you than it did for me or anyone else for that matter. But, if you work really hard, and you're proactive and you befriend other artists, things have a way of coming together. Don't expect it to happen overnight, I'm still in the process of making a name for myself too, but once things get rolling they definitely do pick up steam if you stay on top of your game.

Your work is much better than mine was when I was 18, so if you stay on that path, I think you'll be successful. Take care, and good luck!
Reply
:iconmarcocasalvieri:
marcocasalvieri Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2012  Student Digital Artist
Hey man, just wanted to thank you. It's actually very hard to find a proper answer to what you've written. I read it right after you answered, but until now I've just felt like there wasn't anything say, and probably there isn't. I'll probably have more to say once I'll be able to put in actions your words. I've been feeling unispired and umotivated in the last couple of months and reading this is one of the reasons I didn't get to the point where you say 'enough, I quit'. It's because of people like you that I can keep doing what I love and kill the voices of the people around that just wants to make what I do look like a complete waste of time. So.. thanks!
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:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
We all feel that way from time to time, and being able to push through it is what separates the good artists from the great ones. You obviously have talent and you have to remind yourself that if art were easy, everyone would be doing it. The fact that you've gotten as far as you have speaks to your ability, and you need to remember that you've already accomplished more than most people who want to be artists have.

At the end of the day, it's all about how badly you want it. On more than one occasion I've felt like giving up and doing something else, but then that little voice in the back of my head goes, "Yeah, but what else would you do if not this?" And I go, "Fuck, you're right," and I push myself to break past that hump.

Just keep working hard, and eventually you'll hit a point where it all starts to come together :)
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:iconmarcocasalvieri:
marcocasalvieri Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2012  Student Digital Artist
Thanks again, you have no idea how much I appreciate this. :)
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:iconpupsie:
Pupsie Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
This is actually really helpful! I haven't been trying all that hard to actually be social on DA etc. But i guess you are right when you say 'it's not what you know, it's who you know.' Going to have to work abit harder on that! :aww:
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:iconevildarling:
Evildarling Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Thankyou for sharing :w00t: Untill now I thought that there was something wrong with me, because I take my time when i paint and draw and enjoy the learning process. There is still much more for me to learn :happybounce:

You're absolutely right about YT, the uploaders fail to mention that they are hardworking pro's and that their tutorials/speedpaintings are made for intermidiate and up. Not for beginners.
I won't blame all the speed paintings because they do give a look into other artists way of working and that can be a worth while experience :)
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:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Yeah, I don't think they're intentionally misleading people, it's just that I don't think many of them are doing a good enough job to make it clear.

But you're right, watching those videos can be super beneficial for learning about someone's process.
Reply
:iconskarvalidus:
SkarValidus Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Hmm. OK. I see what you're saying, but I wouldn't say that speedpainting before learning full rendered painting is a bad idea. I think it can give you a chance to try something new (concept-wise) without having to pour as much time into it, and if you aren't trying to learn rendering, but rather learning composition, colour, form, etc., I think that doing thirty fast sketches or speedpaintings can be more beneficial than one long-ass one. However, I'm nowhere near professional, so that's almost certainly not accurate. But what I've been doing for a bit is trying to establish basic paintings without reference (direct reference makes everything super-easy haha), which I would call "speedpaintings". It's helped me gain a far greater understanding of a great deal of concepts that I wouldn't have even noticed if I had been studying from photos, and I think I've managed to pick up a more varied skillset by doing a greater quantity than quality. Of course, this leaves me in the uncomfortable position of having to learn a lot about creating detail, but I think it's doable. In my mind, it's just a different path. I'm not saying I'm absolutely correct, just sharing some thoughts...
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:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
I'm not trying to say there isn't value in doing speed paintings, but as someone else said, it's like learning to run before you can walk if you try that stuff first.

Doing studies is invaluable, but there's a difference between doing a study/sketch, and a speed painting. A study is something that's solely done to learn more about lighting, perspective, and rendering by using reference or direct observation. A speed painting isn't something you're spending time on trying to learn anything at all, you're simply trying to get an idea down.

Which brings me to my next point which is people thinking references are bad. Every professional artist uses reference, the old masters used reference, but for some reason a lot of people think doing so is bad. Doing a painting or a sketch without reference doesn't make someone a better artist, in fact their work typically suffers because of it.
Reply
:iconskarvalidus:
SkarValidus Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Right. All good points. I respect what you are saying highly. I decided to try speedpainting about six months ago and fell on my ass soooo hard. My colours were terrible, subjects uninteresting, composition completely lacking and so forth. Probably like most amateur artists. But since then I've at least developed a semi-passable skill in it. I've been meaning to do a longer project for awhile now, and I've been keeping an eye on which of my speedies I'd like to retry as full pieces, but I can't find one that I like enough to spend anywhere over, say, 15 hours on. But my basic conceptualization skills are certainly improving as I practice, so I think I'll find something decent soon.

I'm also not saying studies are bad, or references. I just want to learn to construct detail instead of copying it. In more intense work, it's easy to grab a reference, but at least for me, that loses its grandeur when you're able to hit near-photo-realism. It's becomes much more fulfilling to create from pure imagination. I totally agree that a complete refusal to refer to photos or life is a massive and unnecessary handicap, however.

I guess that what I mean is that fast paintings (30 mins - 3 hours) can be good to learn with, but in a different way. But a solid foundation, of course, is the first step. Basic understanding can be gained no way other than observation and practice.
Reply
:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Absolutely, there can be a lot to learn from fast conceptualization and trying a bunch of different things, but within reason. If someone isn't developing their core skills while they do speed paintings, then they're hurting themselves.

As for reference, I agree with the idea of creating things out of imagination, but if you want to create convincing concepts or imagery, you have to appropriate things from real life.

Sure, designing a badass military vehicle that's futuristic is good fun and all, but if you want people to believe it could exist, then you have to pay careful attention to the way things like that are actually constructed and designed. The way rivets look, how doors and hatches are hinged, how treads are designed, things like that. You can certainly put your own spin on those things, but trying to create so many fine details purely out of your own head is futile at best, disastrous at its worst.

I'm pretty sure we're on the same page here, though. I just think that a lot of people who talk about not using reference or thinking it's unoriginal, and wanting to create out of their head are making excuses for not having to do the research and work involved.

Some people want to be original almost to a fault, but the truth is, nothing is really original anymore, it's how you take the things that have already been done and make them your own that really counts. The way you combine or change those things is what makes them special.
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:iconskarvalidus:
SkarValidus Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Organizing thoughts into paragraphs is so convenient...

Right, any painting without purpose leaves the artist where he started. Agreed.

And on reference, you're right again. It's interesting to hear your thoughts on it, obviously being someone who paints a lot. It's a good reminder that gathering resources is very important to the final piece. Observation is key. I have to remind myself of that all the time.

Again, awesome to explore your thoughts a bit, haha. Thanks!
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:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
:salute:

The more you can observe the world around you, either directly or through reference, the better understanding of certain things you'll have. Eventually you'll be able to do more with less, and I think that's certainly a desirable goal, but it's easy to mistake "less" for "little" or "none".
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:iconsparatik:
SPARATIK Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011   Digital Artist
this is great news. this is EXACTLY what i'm preaching to myself at this stage of my hopeful art career. i have to learn the tiniest of details and fundamentals before i can do speed painting or as i call "indication art."

i fully understood the concept of "speed paint" though, thanks to feng zhu. it's a pipeline, production thing, done by masters who have already done all the hard work and can easily go in there and finalize what they've only indicated in a speed paint.

it's scary to hear you say "i don't feel i'm ready yet to do speed paints" lol that's fucking motivational. that only means i got a looooooong way to go. but, nothing great ever comes easy. thanks for the motivation, as always. :)
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:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Yeah, Feng Zhu does a good job of trying to push that idea as well. It's not that I'm completely incapable of doing a speed painting, I just don't see the value in it unless I'm on a tight deadline.

The things I do that would be considered similar, I regard more as sketches or studies rather than speed paintings. There's a fine line there I think, but in production, a speed painting is a way of conveying an idea that might be expanded upon further later, or it might not, but in either case, it has to stand on its own as a 'finished' image.

When I do things similar to speed painting, that some might regard as such, I see it as a base sketch, or a quick idea for my own purposes, not something to pass off as finished work.

I did this earlier this year I think as an idea for a painting I might do, but never got around to. [link] Speed painting by some people's standards? Maybe. But to me it's study/idea that I don't really intend on displaying outside of that context.
Reply
:iconsparatik:
SPARATIK Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011   Digital Artist
def love that study. overall, i think we're extremely lucky to be living in a world where we're capable of having that choice.

the better artists, as yourself and feng, can easily do fully rendered images or do quick suggestive paintings for production.

my goal is to have that option. what i love the most about these concept/speed paintings is the ammount of energy, movement, mood and story they have, with the simplest strokes. it's very inspiring.

the steambot guys are monsters at those things. lol keep the insperation coming dude!
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:iconwhitekimahri:
WhiteKimahri Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011
A very interesting reading and an amazing collection of speedpaintings, indeed! Thank you so much for sharing your experience.
And sorry for descending on your journal all of a sudden. Your thoughtful journal is deservedly in the journal home! :)
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:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
:salute:
Reply
:iconalex2007december:
Alex2007December Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011
Just like in any other artistic field. For example, the guitar. You can`t really go and play a Metallica song at full speed from day one. You need shit-loads of time to practice scales, chords, finger mobility, finger memory and so on. Speed does indeed come with practice.
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:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Yeah, absolutely.
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:iconandes-sudo:
Andes-Sudo Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011   Digital Artist
Isn't it strange how speedpainting usually means a landscape or Sci-fi scene?

An interesting read (and video) although I don't totally agree that every artist who is good at speedpainting has absolute mastery of all artistic theory. Some are good at just getting the light right and not giving enough detail to allow deeper inspection. Obviously, the best artists can do "speedpainting" but to them it's just painting at their normal speed because they've reached a level of god-like ability that puny mortals like me won't achieve no matter how much we practice.
I personally would like to wipe my artistic knowledge and start again, there is so much wrong with it that it's hard to repair.
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:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
I can't argue with that. I don't think one needs 'mastery' but they need at least decent fundamental skills in my opinion. Some people jump into speed painting first, and never learn how to detail or finish a work, which is detrimental to their growth.

There's nothing wrong with painterly work, things that aren't hyper realistic, I enjoy that stuff a lot, but it's kind of like the rules of writing. You need to learn the rules before you can know when and how to break them.

I'm a person who hates Picasso's cubist work, but I can't deny that he had an ability to paint realistically as well. He just made that choice to go a different direction, and in that regard I respect him for that.
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:iconandes-sudo:
Andes-Sudo Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011   Digital Artist
:) Don't hate Picasso's cubism! Use that hate on "modern artists" who REALLY ARE shit, like Tracey Emin!
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:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
He's guilty in part for spawning the post-modern crap, so shame on him!
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:iconandes-sudo:
Andes-Sudo Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011   Digital Artist
Hmm, you're probably right. :)
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:iconshade-of-wolf:
shade-of-wolf Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:( Ohzzz I guess I knew this...but still...depressing lol. :icondeterminedplz:
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:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Rofl, sorry :\
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:iconshade-of-wolf:
shade-of-wolf Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Nah, don't be lol.
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:iconart-fromthe-heart:
ART-fromthe-HEART Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
:thumbsup: :D Glad someone said it!
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:iconrahll:
Rahll Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
:salute:
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:iconcombat-banana:
COMBAT-BANANA Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011
I really love speedpaintings and I'd love to know how to do them, but I understood from Life drawing classes that making fast drawings just means you can draw on information gained over a long time. It's a lot harder than fully rendered life drawings for me. Would you recommend, at my level, to start with full pieces then? Or should I wait to learn the fundementals in class? I just started an animation course in college, so I will cover it all soon
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